RUFFSTUFF SPECIALTIES Y-LINK STEERING GM 1-TON TIE ROD CONVERSION KIT "CURE" INSERT PUCK

ID# 000382
RuffStuff Specialties
3237 Rippey Rd #200
Loomis, CA 95650
United States
9166001945 (Main Phone)
9166001945 (Mobile Phone)
Price
$19.00
Payment Info
Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, Paypal
Shipping Info
USPS
Condition
New
Quantity Available
10
Description
RUFFSTUFF SPECIALTIES
THE "CURE"

PART # 1768

THIS DOES NOT FIT DRAG LINK ASSEMBLIES WITH "HIGH ANGLE"
TIE ROD END AT PASSENGER SIDE ATTACHMENT (ES2026R/ES2027L)

This is for the vehicles that have the 1-Ton GM tie rod ends in the Y-Link style steering.
L) Many vehicles get the "dead spot" in the steering wheel. Typically, the driver would find the steering wheel turn a couple inches to the left or right, but yet drive straight.
The issue is that the drag link, the tie rod link from the steering box to the passenger side, creates a "rolling" motion at the passenger side connection. When torque is applied to the steering, this tie rod end rolls up the main tie rod assembly, and when turned the opposite direction, it rolls down the tie rod.
Our "Cure" prevents that up-and-down rolling motion, resulting in a much tighter steering and better control. Made of machined Delrin plastic, this spacer will tighten up the loose spots, and give resistance to the "roll."
Not all tie rod ends are created equal. Some have a long pin, some have a short pin. This item has been specifically made to work with a GM 1-ton tie rod end. In some cases, you may need to sand the outside surface to allow for a flush fit. Proper seating is snug, not tight. It naturally has a grease pocket built-in. In most cases the tie rod boot may need to be removed to properly seat the tie rod end, but will also fit over the boot.

When installing The Cure, be sure to verify that the pin on your tie rod end seats completely in the taper.

Manufacturing tolerances in the pin and the taper cause some tie rod ends to seat higher or lower in the taper than others. One sign that the taper is not completely seated is if the cotter pin hole does not sit as far through the castle nut as it did with the standard dust boot. To verify your pin is seated in the taper, apply a marking compound (like gear marking compound, grease, lipstick, etc.) to the pin and tighten down the tie rod end and then remove it again. Check the pin and taper to see if the marking compound is spread thinly and evenly around the pin. If it does not spread evenly, the pin is likely not seated completely. Sand down the face of The Cure until the pin seats fully.

Depending on the shape of your tie rod ends, some filing may also be required to prevent interferences around the lip or face of The Cure.

The Cure is only meant to be used on the drag link tie rod end in Y-link steering. Using The Cure at the steering knuckle/tie rod joints will not allow necessary flex in your steering system and could lead to failure of your tie rod ends or other steering components.
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